Mojo: Conjure Stories

Mojo: Conjure Stories Review

The Barnes & Noble Review
Mojo -- a powerful, disturbing anthology edited by Nalo Hopkinson that explores the world of voodoo -- contains short stories by some of the biggest names in modern fantasy, including Neil Gaiman, Barbara Hambly, Steven Barnes, Andy Duncan, and Tananarive Due. Although the stories explore the myths and legends of personal magic, the subject matter ranges widely from African warriors in the holds of slave ships to abused children plotting revenge to drag queens to the undead living in affluent closed communities.



In Neil Gaiman's "Bitter Grounds," an anthropology professor is on his way to a conference in New Orleans to present a paper on the legend of the Haitian coffee girls, undead children who allegedly went door-to-door selling a chicory coffee mixture just before the dawn. When his car breaks down on a backwoods road, he runs into a mysterious Samaritan who comes into his life for a very definite reason.



The introduction by Luisah Teish, a popular spiritualist and author of Jambalaya: The Natural Woman's Book of Personal Charms and Practical Rituals, says it all: "Reader, Be Aware! There's a conjuring going on. You are being lured, with the turning of each page, into the myth and mystery of our DeepBlack magical heritage."



Unlike many anthologies, this collection of 19 original stories has no weak spots. Every tale is strong, unique, and noteworthy in its own right. Fans of Nalo Hopkinson works like Brown Girl in the Ring and the short story collection Skin Folk will cherish this brilliant collection. Paul Goat Allen

Title:Mojo: Conjure Stories
Edition Language:English

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    Mojo: Conjure Stories Reviews

  • Ken

    All anthologies are uneven, but this is one of the more consistently good collections I've found. Contains some truly wonderful writing. When the piece by Neil Gaiman is one of the weakest in the bunc...

  • Alakee Bes

    Connected yet disconnected stories -mixing and introducing spirit and mystery... A good read and the short stories allow u to jump in and out!...

  • Owen

    Great compilation. Many stories really creeped me out. I was glad to read it, and then glad to put it down. ...

  • Mocha Girl

    The introduction of Mojo: Conjure Stories warns the reader to beware, to adorn their protective beads, to pocket their jujubags and sets the stage for the mystical anthology contained therein. The nov...

  • branewurms

    A few of these fell kind of flat for me, but overall I found this to be a great collection. Oddly, my favorite of the bunch was Lark Till Dawn, Princess - the one about the drag queen. I say "oddly" b...

  • Julia

    This is a colleciton of short fiction which touches on various aspects of vodou, African and African-American folklore and magic. The stories all have strikingly different takes on subjects such as sh...

  • Kurt

    Short stories. I like the idea often more than the execution. Sometimes short story collections are hit and miss... a few good ones and mostly bad ones. I actually enjoyed a majority of stories in her...

  • Frankie Lennon

    I've chosen this highly entertaining and fascinating collection of short stories to my English literature and composition class reading list. It's editied by a well known African American woman writer...

  • K.H. Vaughan

    All anthologies are uneven, but this is one of the more consistently good collections I've found. Contains some truly wonderful writing. When the piece by Neil Gaiman is one of the weakest in the bunc...

  • Vasha7

    Mostly serious, sometimes horrific; quite an interesting assortment. I really loved Gerard Houarner's story "She'd Make a Dead Man Crawl", and I wonder why I've not seen much mention of it from other ...