New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future

New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future Review

As the world around us increases in technological complexity, our understanding of it diminishes. Underlying this trend is a single idea: the belief that our existence is understandable through computation, and more data is enough to help us build a better world.
 
In actual fact, we are lost in a sea of information, increasingly divided by fundamentalism, simplistic narratives, conspiracy theories, and post-factual politics. Meanwhile, those in power use our lack of understanding to further their own interests. Despite the accessibility of information, we’re living in a new Dark Age.
 
From rogue financial systems to shopping algorithms, from artificial intelligence to state secrecy, we no longer understand how our world is governed or presented to us. The media is filled with unverifiable speculation, much of it generated by anonymous software, while companies dominate their employees through surveillance and the threat of automation.
 
In his brilliant new work, leading artist and writer James Bridle excavates the limits of technology and how it aids our understanding of the world. Surveying the history of art, technology, and information systems, he explores the dark clouds that gather over our dreams of the digital sublime.

Title:New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future

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    New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future Reviews

  • Alexandre Coates

    I cannot sing the praises of this book enough, it is the kind of thing I have long wanted to read, and here it is, better thought out than I could have hoped. I have thought over many of the topics in...

  • Mehrsa

    This book had some real bright spots--the introduction was riveting and made me giddy about the book's possibilities. But it did not meet expectations. I've been waiting for a philosophical take on th...

  • Peter Mcloughlin

    tour of the dark and surreal media and digital landscape that envelops us. We are in a world of conspiracy theories. Breakdown of knowledge and action. A world where everybody knows what is going on b...

  • Jason

    Based on the title NEW DARK AGE alone, we might well go in expecting author James Bridle to take on the roll of canary in the coalmine. If carbon ideologues cannot stop carping on their mandate to kee...

  • Artem Gordin

    I can't say it's a good book, but "New Dark Age" raises questions so important and I enjoyed it so much that I feel necessary to rate it highly. Just like its subject – the interconnected cloud/netw...

  • Reuben

    A sustained attack on the idea that more information equals greater understanding, that all problems have rational and logical solutions, and that, when in doubt, we can train a computer to solve them...

  • Bryan Alexander

    Quick note: I thought this was going to target Silicon Valley, but instead the book reaches more broadly, seeing our world entering a confused, flailing epoch.It uses cloud as a key term, starting fro...

  • Steffi

    ‘Tech stuff’, actually not my cup of tea which is probably a very stupid thing to say in 2018 where every aspect of our lives is in one way or another influenced by ‘the internet’ and ‘techn...

  •   LunaBel

    Unfortunately, I have not seen fulfilled the promises of the introduction. It could have been a great read was it not mainly consisting of a number of unremarkable remarks about the advance of technol...

  • Paulo Reis

    If the Talking Cricket would write a book about information technology, this would be it.Divided in thematic chapters, each one on a specific view/topic on how information systems is transforming the ...